98ABROAD/ VIDEO


Thursday February 21, 2013
Beirut, 11 Road 12 Mahmoud SedkyAgouza, Cairo

98weeks has been invited to present a film program in context of the spring season to at Beirut. The program that brings together a series of films that critically unfold the notions of resistance and state from different geographical and historical perspectives, thus inviting to reconsider these notions and what they could mean in different contexts.

THE YOUNG MAN WAS
Part 1: United Red Army Naeem Mohaiemen, 67 minutes, 2011

On September 28th 1977, JAL 472 lands in Dhaka. Later, the lead negotiator explains that they had to allow the landing, because the pilot said he was running out of fuel. 

The film pivots off the audio transcripts of negotiations over the next five days. Shumon Bashar wrote in Tank: “the crackly voices of these two strangers hurled into a forced, awkward intimacy… the tone with which they started their discussion was peculiarly polite, until the accord between ransom and reason reached breaking point.” The film is part of a long-form research project since 2006, which looks at the 1970s ultra-left.

THE ANABASIS OF MAY AND FUSAKO SHIGENOBU, MASAO ADACHI AND 27 YEARS WITHOUT IMAGES
2011, 66 minutes, Super 8 and HD video

Who are May and Fusako Shigenobu? Fusako — leader of an extremist left-wing faction, the Japanese Red Army, involved in a number of terrorist operations — has been in hiding in Beirut for almost 30 years. May, her daughter, born in Lebanon, only discovered Japan at the age of twenty-seven, after her mother’s arrest in 2000. And Masao Adachi? A screenwriter and radical activist filmmaker, committed to armed struggle and the Palestinian cause, was also underground in Lebanon for several decades before being sent back to his native country. In his years as a film director, he had been one of the instigators of a ‘theory of landscape’ — fukeiron: through filming landscapes, Adachi sought to reveal the structures of oppression that underpin and perpetuate the political system. Anabasis? The name given, since Xenophon, to wandering, circuitous homeward journeys.