98WEEKS UPCOMING EVENTS







MAKHZIN MAGAZINE
DECEMBER INTERVIEW
EMMA RAMADAN BY MIRENE ARSANIOS
Mirene Arsanios interviews Emma Ramadan on her translation of the genderless novel Sphinx, written in 1986 by French author Anne Garréta.
Emma Ramadan is a literary translator based in Brooklyn. Her translation of Anne Garréta's Sphinx was published by Deep Vellum and her translation of Garréta's Not One Day is also forthcoming from Deep Vellum in 2016. Her creative writing has appeared in places such as Five Dials, Recess, Gigantic Sequins, and Belleville Park Pages. 

Anne F. Garréta graduated from France’s prestigious École normale supérieure and was co-opted into the Oulipo in April 2000. She has been a lecturer at the University of Rennes II since 1995 and also teaches at Duke University as a Research Professor of Literature and Romance Studies. Her first novel, Sphinx (Grasset, 1986), hailed by critics, tells a love story between two people without giving any indication of grammatical gender for the narrator or the narrator’s love interest, A***. Her second novel, Ciels liquides (Grasset, 1990), recounts the fate of a character losing the use of language. In La Décomposition (Grasset, 1999), a serial killer methodically murders characters from Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time. She won France’s prestigious Prix Médicis in 2002, awarded each year to an author whose “fame does not yet match their talent” for Pas un jour (Grasset, 2002).







98WEEKS AT FRIENDS WITH BOOKS: ART BOOK FAIR BERLIN
HAMBURGER BANHOFF BERLIN
DECEMBER 11TH-13TH
98weeks will be sharing a table with Fehras Publishing Practices at Friends with Books Art Book Fair. Come browse our chapbook, magazine, and printed matter selection! Full program here.
 




AFTER EVIL, A PUBLIC TALK BY ROBERT MEISTER
IN CONVERSATION WITH WALID SADEK AND AHMAD DALLAL
ORGANIZED BY BICAR
FRIDAY DECEMBER 4TH, 5PM, MEYZAN CAFE, HAMRA, BEIRUT.
The way in which mainstream human rights discourse speaks of such evils as the Holocaust, slavery, or apartheid puts them solidly in the past. Its elaborate techniques of “transitional" justice encourage future generations to move forward by creating a false assumption of closure, enabling those who are guilty to elude responsibility. This approach to history, common to late-twentieth-century humanitarianism, doesn't presuppose that evil ends when justice begins. Rather, it assumes that a time before justice is the moment to put evil in the past. In this talk, Robert Meister merges examples from literature, history, anthropology, political philosophy and theology to confront the problem of closure and the resolution of historical injustice. He challenges the empty moral logic of "never again" or the theoretical reduction of evil to a cycle of violence and counterviolence, broken only once evil is remembered for what it was. Meister criticizes such methods for their deferral of justice and susceptibility to exploitation.

Robert Meister is professor of social and political thought in the Department of the History of Consciousness at the University of California, Santa Cruz. An active participant in California higher education politics, he is director of the Bruce Initiative on Rethinking Capitalism at UCSC and the author of After Evil: A Politics of Human Rights and Political Identity: Thinking Through Marx.